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Holy Necklace IV - Human Hair

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20181118-192446.jpg
20181118-192530.jpg

Holy Necklace IV - Human Hair

108.00

108 is the magic number of holy necklaces from religions around the world. The rosary. The mala. Even in Native American traditions 108 mountain laurel seeds (used by Medicine Men to visit the Spirit World) could be traded for a horse. In this series of holy necklaces, I took objects form my life and strung them together to suggest it is not the material that makes the necklace holy but rather the 108 number seemingly connecting us all together. Because isn’t there more that connects than separates really?

As a member of the Sikh religion, you would believe honoring God includes never shearing any hair on his body. In another example, Voodoo (Vodun) is a derivative of the world's oldest known religions which have been around in Africa since the beginning of human civilization. Some conservative estimates these civilizations and religions to be over 10 000 years old. This then identify Voodoo as probably the best example of African syncretism in the Americas. Although its essential wisdom originated in different parts of Africa long before the Europeans started the slave trade, the structure of Voodoo, as we know it today, was born in Haiti during the European colonization of Hispaniola. In Voodoo, hair is a way to channel a specific person during rituals.

In my own way, I collected my own hair and the hair of women that were important to me from their hair brushes. I hand-felted these hairs into round disks - something pioneer women did in the early 1800’s to make buttons - using every part of their lives to forward their lives. There was no waste. Because they had so little, every thing was important and had intrinsic potential value.

This necklace is more of a work of art - it can be worn - if they buyer is comfortable wearing other women’s hair. The guru bead of this necklace is a mirrored disc, hand sauntered. It offers the wearer an opportunity of self-reflection. The wooden beads are from a broken and reconstructed rosary.

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